Best of Bogotá

My mom might not have been happy with the fact that I went to Colombia, but I sure was. Flights were so reasonable, and what else is a girl to do over a long holiday weekend?

On my first full day there, I set out to climb Monserrate, a mountain with sweeping views of the city. I don’t know what I was expecting, but the hike was tougher than I imagined. Fighting the rising heat, the altitude, and the physical exertion along with my pacemaker- I finally reached the top.

But maybe it took so long because I kept stopping at every turn to stare behind me. Look at these views! There was a church, several restaurants, and other shops at the top. You can also reach the peak by funicular, but if you can handle it, the hike is well worth it.

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After heading back down, I wandered around Bogotá, exploring La Candelaria and surrounding neighborhoods.

The cathedral, capitol, Plaza de Bolivar, Museo del Oro, Silva Poetry House, Gabriel Garcia Márquez mural & museum, and many more were highlights throughout these narrow streets.

And I also stumbled into ALL THIS GORGEOUS ART.

No, really though…

The coffee, of course, was delicious. As was all the food (and mounds of chocolate) I tried!

As always, there is danger in any place. Please use precaution and be smart, especially when traveling solo. But don’t ever let fear of the unknown & stereotypes or opinions of others hold you back from experiencing life! The most wonderful things happen outside right outside your comfort zone.

 

Until next time,

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The Emerald Isle

Where do I begin? How do I explain what has transpired in these two beautiful, intense weeks? Ireland has been a dream destination for what seemed like years, and my MFA program gave me the opportunity to not only travel there, but also to work with brilliant Irish writers and mentors.

I flew into bustling Dublin with my friend Jaclyn and we promptly rented a car to drive to Cork. Here’s where our whirlwind weekend began- Blarney to Cork, Galway to the Cliffs of Moher, Belfast to Giant’s Causeway, and at last to Dublin, where we studied at Trinity College for two weeks and took a day to trip to Howth. There were way too many pints between classes, friends made, and laughs shared to count, but here are a few snapshots that help frame those wonderful memories:

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Blarney Castle

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Cork

Cliffs of Moher

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Galway

Belfast

Giant’s Causeway

Dublin

Trinity College

Howth

Already counting down until the next residency! But for now, the work of practicum begins.

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DOPEnhagen

Q: What do you get when you gather seven friends, set them loose in a historic capital city, subtract your worries, multiply Carlsbergs and explored streets, and add in another country border crossing?

A: An unforgettable weekend.

My first impression of Copenhagen was that it reminded me somewhat of Amsterdam: the canals, the amount of bicycles, art and architecture, etc. But the Danish and the Dutch are quite different!

Our first stop was Nyhavn, the famous canal with brightly colored waterfront homes, shopping, restaurants, and more. We stopped for some smørrebrød before continuing past the wooden ships in the harbor.

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Nyhavn

On the way to the iconic Little Mermaid statue, we stumbled upon St. Alban’s Church and the picturesque landscape surrounding it.

The city itself was very walkable, and public transportation was also convenient. I got the tourist card for 72 hours at the airport, which came in handy for the metro, buses, and trains. By the end of the afternoon, we made a final stop at Tivoli Gardens, and I wasn’t sure what to expect. I knew it was an amusement park, but it was the middle of February. Surely nothing would be open and running. Wrong. Not only was this park a winter wonderland with its beautiful and brightly shining lights, but it was quite the happening place! We went for a ride on the antique roller coaster, screaming with delight as it whipped around corners and cut through the night.

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Tivoli- winter wonderland

The next day, we wandered Strøget window shopping and climbed Rundertaarn, a round tower with an incredible view of the city, as seen below:

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Other notable sights: Amalienborg Palace, Christiansborg Palace and the Renaissance-era Rosenborg Castle.

Sunday afternoon, we took a train to Malmö, Sweden.

It was awesome to spend the afternoon in another country, wandering the city squares, stopping for a drink, and seeking out the Turning Torso tower.

We saw Stortorget, the oldest square, and got our bearings as we searched for the next café or landmark destination.

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All of the locals we encountered in both countries were exceptionally helpful and friendly. It only added to the already charming cities.

Our final stop was Öresund Bridge, which was a breathtaking view as the sunset stretched across the sky. I’ve never seen such beautiful blue and peach hues. Crazy how many moments you want to bottle up just so you could relive them again.

After arriving back in Copenhagen, we explored Christiana (Freetown) in the dark, which was really trippy, but such an interesting place.

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If you ever get the opportunity to go, I can’t recommend it enough. Truly Dopenhagen. This was without a doubt a weekend for the books!

Until next time,

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Pittsburgh Poetry Review Roadshow

Calling yinz near and far, check out Pittsburgh Poetry Review!

My poem “Tuesdays at Baum Grove” was published in Issue Two, and I read at the  Pittsburgh Poetry Review Roadshow last night (Thursday, May 19th) at  Té Café in Squirrel Hill with Jen Ashburn.

(Note: Seeing your name on a poster for the first time as a featured reader is pretty cool.)

Some photos from the evening.

 

I read a total of ten poems, one of which I had literally thrown together that same afternoon. Some I had written in my Madwomen workshops, some came from my experiences in Spain, and others uncovered the emotions behind getting my pacemaker.

Jen Ashburn, who lived in Japan for four years, graced us with her incredible poems, as did Jason Irwin and Jill Khoury for the Open Mic session.

Although I didn’t try any tea, Té Café had some really good coffee in cups the size of giant soup bowls. Definitely will be coming back for the poetry and the caffeine 🙂

Check out next week’s readers Edward Murray, Jamilla Rice, and Janeen Rastall. Same place, same time!

Pittsburgh Poetry Review currently publishes 3 issues a year, March, July, and November. You can find more information on their website or on their Facebook page.

 

Special thanks again to those that made this possible: Michael Albright, Jennifer Jackson Berry, and Daniel Shapiro for seeing something in my work and taking a chance on me.

Thanks so much to everyone that came out! Hope you enjoyed my words as much as I loved reading them.

 

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