A Taste of the Pura Vida Life

YOU GUYS….I’d had Costa Rica on my bucket list for a while, but wanted to wait until I was able to take more vacation days so that I could spend longer there.  I knew there was so much to see and explore, and I wanted to take advantage of all of it! Finally though, after obsessively checking flight prices, I decided to just take the leap and go with the short time I had. Jungle, coastlines, extreme sports/adventures, biodiversity- you name it, I knew there was so much to discover about the #puravida way.

Now that I have returned, I can say Costa Rica was not only worth the hype it gets, but also one of my FAVORITE trips to date, especially because of the incredible people I met. (Oh, and the whole run-in with the police is an entertaining story, too.) Let’s back up, though–

I flew into San José and stayed one night in the city. I met an amazing older woman, Lynn, at my hostel. She was in her sixties, divorced, with two grown daughters, in better shape than me, and had been traveling C.R. for over a month. It isn’t often that you meet an older woman traveling solo (let alone staying in hostels) and I instantly was inspired by her story. She was #goals for multiple reasons.

Our hostel was located right near the National Museum of Costa Rica (shown below). A huge fan of street art, I spent the first afternoon wandering around, admiring the murals:

And the early evening relaxing in a hammock at the hostel with a beer after dinner:

The next day, I met up with Cassandra (from Haiti, living in N.Y.), who was also staying at my hostel, and we caught a city bus to Irazú Volcano. Look at this crater! The color is just unbelievable.

This is also where we met Alex and Kayo- two friends/coworkers from Nashville who were traveling together, and Jerdy, another solo traveler from the Netherlands. We were a fast group of friends. On the bus back to San José, we decided to take a detour and get off at Cartago.

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Posing in front of the Templo Inconcluso de Santiago Apóstol.

This is where it became evident that sometimes it’s more about who you are with than where you are. The five of us shared dinner together, so many laughs, and too many stories. Check out some of the sights we saw wandering the town below: La Negrita, the Black Madonna shrine at Our Lady of the Angels Basilica, Santiago Apostól Parish Ruins, etc.

Alex and Kayo, who had rented a car, decided to switch up their travel plans and drive to La Fortuna the next morning with me, so I got to spend more time with them. Jerdy came for the ride as well.

This is where shit gets fun- somewhere near Sarapiqui, along highway 4, we’re cut off by a police SUV, apparently for crossing a yellow line. We were shocked, and a little scared. And then, a little suspicious…

They tried to fine us $500, but with Jerdy’s Spanish and expert persuading, we ended up being able to give them a $20 bill and driving away. Alex’s grip was more focused on the wheel after that, for sure.

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Always an adventure! HA

But, we made it there! First on our list was to visit La Fortuna waterfall. I thought about ditching the boys once I found this friend:

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Kidding. I could never. We became a family so quickly! These intentional, unbreakable bonds that form when you’re on the road, away from home, soaking in moments. And to be able to stumble out of the wooded path into this clearing, where the water rushed down, was a sight I loved sharing with them.

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La Fortuna waterfall was gorgeous, no doubt. And Alex is a fantastic photographer.

We all dove in- well, maybe not dove, because the water was absolutely frigid, but you couldn’t not experience it!

We spent the rest of the day at a water hole where tons of locals hung out and did the rope swing. I was impressed by their talent! I, for one, knew my nonathletic self and also got my fill of the cool water. Later that evening, we connected after the hike with a guide, Daniel, who took us to a local hot springs. It was honestly amazing, being able to slide down the rocks like a gigantic waterslide, traverse underwater caves, drink whiskey from the bottle, and talk about life under only the moonlight and the soft glow of a lamp, hung on shore.

The next day I had booked a tour to Arenal National Park, where we hiked Arenal Volcano and walked across the hanging bridges. It was otherworldly. We may or may not have been slightly hungover from our late night. But we powered through, admiring the beauty of rainbow trees and watching for monkeys swinging through the branches. Just scrolling through the collage below, you can tell, it was easy to disconnect, and feel connected here…

I’ve been traveling for almost a decade now, and I have met a lot of people as a solo traveler. And as anyone who travels frequently or long term can attest to, there are friends you make that do become like your family. These guys carved out their own…the way we instantly felt as ease with one another, made each other laugh, let stories flow as swift as that water rushing into the natural pool below- some things are natural.

And some natural things, like the lushness of the jungle, rugged beaches, towering volcanoes, or the biodiversity in Costa Rica, are just unreal. I loved this country, and I can’t wait to return someday. I want to soak a little longer in the simple life, the pure life. There is meaning here. Until then-

 Pura vida!

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For Women Who Roar

FWWRI have always been drawn to the fearless, unapologetic, strong women who roar: the ones that seek out adventures on their own, who carve their own path with their experiences, who shape the world with their ideas, and shake it with their voices.

I am honored to have a poem included here in this #MeToo e-Book- such an important project giving a voice to women everywhere.

 

Keep roaring,

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The Getaway

By now, I’m sure most of you have seen the picturesque, tiny Getaway cabins on Instagram or Facebook. Ads for them are nearly everywhere, and their large bedside windows make for incredible photoshoots, I must admit.

My friend Candice and I had been interested in renting one, and we finally found a weekend in September that worked with both of our crazy schedules.

We drove to Lisbon, OH and checked out what it was all about. When we first entered the cabin, there was a cute note left on the table inside, complimentary s’mores, and a small guidebook. A cute personal touch!

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Here was our cabin, “Clyde” and the stretch of open field next to the long drive down to it:

It was equipped with every basic supply we needed- minus food. See here for the entire list of items. On our last night, we enjoyed some homemade wine and more s’mores.

On Saturday, we drove along Little Beaver Creek and then stumbled upon the (very odd, tbh) Leetonia Beehive Coke Ovens Park:

And on Sunday, we hit the Johnny Appleseed Festival in Lisbon, where I enjoyed the BEST apple dumpling of my entire 29 years:

We also went paddleboarding at Lake Milton State Park, dined at The Courthouse Inn & Restaurant/Love Cafe (an absolute must if you’re in town!), saw an amazing sunset, and visited the World’s Largest Teapot on the way back to Pittsburgh.

I have never felt so Instagram-ish in my life. I leave you with two of my favorite shots:

Our only disappointment with this experience is that the cabins aren’t as remote as they appear to be- you’re actually among a group of other cabins, in a campground-like setting. Still, it’s worth the experience. Have you tried it?

Until the next getaway,

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Twenty-nine, Trinidad & Tobago

What do you do when you’re feelin’ fine & about to turn 29? Book a flight to Trini, of course!   Image result for heart eye emoji

I’ve been making it my mission to give myself a birthday gift in the form of a trip each year, and this was no exception. I traveled solo to Trinidad & Tobago after snagging a decent flight. A relaxing, tropical adventure awaited me. Or did it?

Of course, this was another short trip- flying into Piarco International Airport, spending time in Port of Spain- near Newtown. I spent my first full day walking around the entire perimeter of Queen’s Park Savannah, past the U.S. Embassy (which was conveniently very close to my hostel), the Queen’s Royal College, Archbishop’s House, Stollmeyer’s Castle, Emperor Valley Zoo, National Museum & Art Gallery, and the not-to-be-missed National Academy for the Performing Arts, etc.. But I wasn’t here for just the city…

I wanted to spend time in Tobago, so I caught a ferry from Port of Spain to Scarborough. From there, I made my stay in Crown Point.  Sandy Point Beach, Store Bay Beach, Coconut Bay, Swallow’s Beach, and Pigeon Point were my home grounds, and they were all close and gorgeous beaches! On my last day, the island did get hit with some rain, but I took cover at Bago’s Beach Bar and made friends with the locals. And don’t worry- before that, I’d gotten plenty of time with my booty in the sand, and a fresh coconut in my hand.

Just check it out:

Gorgeous, right?! If I still had a drink in hand, I’d cheers ya in the tropics– but until next time…

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P.S. Have you ever traveled for your birthday? If so, I’d love to hear the destination and how the experience was for you!

The Great White North

I have been blessed beyond measure with two supportive, loving, and hard-working people. They’ve watched me grow up, follow my dreams, wander around lost, make mistakes, fail, and get back up again. I know many people who either do not have good relationships with their parents (whether it be due to their lack of support, abuse, toxic traits, distance, e.t.c.) or people who no longer have their parents living. I want to be sure I cherish this time, these memories, and these two people, while I still can.

So, I convinced them to take a trip with me! (Can you believe it?) My mom likes to travel, but my dad is more of a homebody. Still, I thought he would enjoy the beautiful Canadian landscapes. Banff National Park had been on my bucket list for some time (and I thought it’d be easier to convince them to travel somewhere on the same continent, haha).

We flew into Calgary shortly after the Canadian Independence day, and just before ours. I wasn’t certain how busy a 4th of July weekend trip would be, but we weren’t overwhelmed with tourists at all. We spent a week traveling from Calgary to Canmore to Banff to Yoho to Kootenay to Jasper National Park in a rental car. Patience was tested, buttons were pushed, but we all made it out the other side!

Here are some highlights:

Four National Parks

We stayed the first night in Canmore, where we hiked the beautiful Grassy Lakes Trail (shown below). I have never seen water this color- it was unbelievable! Though it was a bit of a hike for all of us, the views were more than worth it. My parents are both in their mid-60’s, and I’m so, so proud of them for pushing through and following along with my crazy adventures! It wouldn’t have been the same without them. I think more than anything, this trip opened up our eyes to how fortunate we are to have healthy and capable bodies.

From Canmore, we continued on into Banff.

The famous beautiful lakes/sights-

Banff:

  • Peyto Lake
  • Lake Louise
  • Moraine Lake
  • Lake Minnewanka
  • Bow Lake
  • Johnston Canyon
  • Fairmont Banff Springs

Lake Moraine was one of the most stunning lakes, in my opinion. It almost seemed like it shone a different hue at every angle. I couldn’t stop staring at it. I decided to hurry and hike to the top of a cliff to get a better view, and told my parents I’d be back shortly. I knew they’d need rest after all the exercise we were getting. Once I reached the top, to my surprise, I saw my dad had followed me up! It was a special moment to have him there and able to see firsthand the incredible beauty before us. Again, the lake seemed to radiate a different blue shade from above. Because we were up for more adventure, we continued on to explore even more National Parks:

Yoho:

  • Natural Bridge
  • Emerald Lake
  • Takakkaw Falls
  • Kicking Horse Pass
  • Mount Victoria

Kootenay:

  • Paint Pots
  • Healy Pass Trail
  • Mount Assiniboine Park

Jasper:

  • Athabasca Glacier
  • Athabasca Falls
  • Maligne Lake
  • Maligne Canyon

My mom’s bucket list item was to see a glacier, so we made sure to make Jasper National Park our last destination, so we could walk out on Athabasca Glacier and even touch the water running down. We did this through the Columbia Icefield Adventure. The tires on those vehicles were as tall as me! Fun fact: there’s only about 30 of them that exist. Oh, and check out the traffic we ran into in the top left photo-

We only had rain one day, at Emerald Lake, and though we didn’t see a bear, we did narrowly miss one hiking- so thank goodness for that! I think my mom would have pooped her pants 😉 Some of the highlights of the trip included my dad making calls out the window to the elk and watching them lift their heads up & look around, getting mom to shuffle across the glass floor Skywalk, and seeing the blue beauties of the lakes for the first time.

I am so glad I had the chance to take this trip while we all were in good health and able to hike. No matter if you believe in heaven or not, this wide open slice of it is truly beautiful, and I was blessed to share it with my mom and dad.

Until next time, the Great White North–

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P.S. Where do you think I should go with my parents try to convince my parents to go with me next?

Ireland Residency #2

JUNE 2-17, 2019

I know I said my last residency was going to be January in Pittsburgh, but I decided I couldn’t miss out on one last opportunity to spend two weeks in the beautiful country of Ireland, learning from and connecting with incredible writers. Thus, I tacked on one more residency of my MFA program. (Click here to read about my first!)

I deeply missed my travel companion, Jaclyn, but still very much enjoyed solo travel in Limerick. I caught a flight there early to spend a couple days exploring before nestling into my dorm room at Trinity College, Dublin, for the two week residency.

Limerick was an adorable city, and I spent most of my short time walking over Thomond Bridge and along the River Shannon, admiring King John’s castle, St. Mary’s Cathedral, and the beautiful street art and roses. I stopped in for a coffee at Jack Monday’s, breakfast at Bakehouse 22,  had a drink at Katie Daly’s Heritage Pub, and dined at Nelly’s Corner. (I basically ate my way back to my AirBnb. But really.) I spent a lot of time in People’s Park, sitting on a bench in the sunshine, and writing. I got lost downtown, stumbled upon Tait’s Clock, and browsing countless boutiques. While I was there, I also saw the Treaty Stone and visited the Milk Market, one of the oldest markets in the country. The Locke Bar next to Matthew Bridge was a great choice for my last night, as I experienced traditional music and dancing. It was a peaceful two days before the residency. See below:

The next day, I caught a bus near Arthur’s Quay Park to Dublin. Can I just say I love how easily you can travel this entire country?

Okay, okay- so now the writing part. During my first residency, in June 2018, I worked with the wonderful Irish poet Enda Wyley. I’ve never met a more passionate reader/writer. She reawakened my excitement for the written word and its endless possibilities. Here are all the current mentors in the Carlow/Trinity program:

 Evelyn Conlon, Fiction
 Carlo Gébler, Fiction
 Brian Leyden, Nonfiction
 Jean O’Brien, Poetry
 Enda Wyley, Poetry

Visiting writers during June 2018 residency:

Thomas McCarthy, Poet (Master Class Instructor)
Sinéad Gleeson, Nonfiction
Richard Blanco, Poetry
Ann Harverty, Fiction
Alannah Hopkin, Nonfiction
Claire Keegan, Fiction
Mark Roper, Poetry
Declan Meade, Editor
Rosita Boland, Nonfiction

What a lineup, huh? So for this most recent residency (June 2018), I was lucky to work with another Irish poet, the fierce Jean O’Brien. Jean taught me to survive my grief, and to “kill the ruddy doves!”

Visiting writers during this June 2019 residency:

Paula Meehan, Poet  (Master Class instructor)
Caitriona Lally, Fiction
Annemarie Ni Churreain, Poetry
Claire Keegan, Fiction
Sinéad Gleeson, Nonfiction
Kevin Barry, Fiction
Nithy Kasa, Poetry
Emilie Pine, Nonfiction
Danny Denton, Editor/Fiction

*Paul Muldoon reading

Every session was rich in its content, every writer was captivating in their craft. Unfortunately, I got sick somewhere between Limerick and Dublin, and the sickness seemed to spread like wildfire throughout the group. I had plenty of hot toddies to soothe my throat, and still managed to attend nearly every reading.

We also took a trip to Boyne Valley/Newgrange area, where I enjoyed the biggest Irish stew & coffee after exploring the Hill of Tara and Trim Castle:

That’s Valerie and I doing weird yoga poses in the photo halfway down on the left, one of my new favorite pictures 🙂

There is a part of Dublin, with its gritty streets, its green plazas, its rolling and quiet beauty, that roars on– a song cemented in my heart. I am forever grateful for the experiences I have had here, shared among friends and mentors, and the opportunity to connect with these brilliant writers, learning from them and their history.

 

These are just snapshots of a place, of laughter, of people in time. I take so many photos because I want to remember it all. And I’m so glad I do. A fellow student, Elicia Parkinson, passed away suddenly in October. She was a brilliant creative nonfiction writer and a dedicated student. Elicia, I hope wherever you are is as beautiful and lush as Ireland’s green pastures, and filled to the brim with books just as heavenly.

Our director included this poem in her e-mail to us, and I want to close this post with it.

 

And Yet the Books
And yet the books will be there on the shelves, separate beings,

That appeared once, still wet
As shining chestnuts under a tree in autumn,
And, touched, coddled, began to live
In spite of fires on the horizon, castles blown up,
Tribes on the march, planets in motion.
“We are, ” they said, even as their pages
Were being torn out, or a buzzing flame
Licked away their letters. So much more durable
Than we are, whose frail warmth
Cools down with memory, disperses, perishes.
I imagine the earth when I am no more:
Nothing happens, no loss, it’s still a strange pageant,
Women’s dresses, dewy lilacs, a song in the valley.
Yet the books will be there on the shelves, well born,
Derived from people, but also from radiance, heights.

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